Historical Branson Missouri

JOHN DILLINGER HISTORICAL CRIME MUSEUM "WE CAN'T ALL BE SAINTS" “THIS IS A STICK UP!” No Fun & Games "GET ALONG LITTLE DOGIE" "NOW BILLIE, WHO'S SMARTER ME OR THE COPS?" "NEVER TRUST A WOMAN OR AN AUTOMATIC WEAPON" CRIME MUSEUM PHOTO GALLERY CRIME MUSEUM PHOTO GALLERY TWO CRIME MUSEUM - CHRONOLOGICAL INSIGHT CRIME MUSEUM DILLINGER GUN MEMOIRS OF THE AUTHOR CRIME MUSEUM LINKS MORE CRIME MUSEUM LINKS CRIME MUSEUM GUEST BOOK NEW CRIME BOOKS HISTORICAL BRANSON MISSOURI



The Historical Significance of Missouri

Long before Branson shows and exciting vacation packages brought tourists from around the world to the state of Missouri, the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers brought explorers to the land. From Jacques Marquette and Louis Jolliet to the famous Lewis and Clark Expedition, Missouri has a rich history of exploration. Missouri was the 24th state to become a part of the United States of America, although before it gained acceptance as a state, the area sparked great debates. The Missouri Compromise is still cited as an example of how political compromises can be effective short-term solutions.

Missouri: History and Exploration

The area known today for entertaining shows and its two beautiful rivers was once inhabited by native people, as far back as 12,000 B.C. It was later discovered by two French men in the year 1673. Jacques Marquette and Louis Jolliet discovered the area while traveling down the Mississippi River. The two men were assigned to act as missionaries to the native people of the lands when they made the discovery. It was not until the 1710's that the French began to settle in the area, then considered Louisiana. For the several years after the French began to settle in what would later become Missouri, they had little control over the area. Eventually, the Spanish took control over the land. In the 1800s, however, Spain returned the land to the French as part of the Treaty of San Ildefonso. In 1803, President Thomas Jefferson made a deal to purchase the area known as Louisiana from France. Jefferson purchased 827,000 miles of land that was located directly west of the famous Mississippi River from the French. The purchase of this land from the French is known as the Louisiana Purchase. Not long after the Louisiana Purchase, President Jefferson sent explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark to explore the new land. Eventually, Americans began to settle in the area. Later in 1821, Missouri gained acceptance as the 24th state of the United States.

 

 

The Missouri Compromise

Before Missouri was admitted as a state in 1821, there was a large debate over its acceptance. The state of Missouri was to be admitted as a state that was in favor of slavery. This became a problem for those who were against slavery, as it would have threatened the balance that existed between states that were for slavery and states that were against it. In efforts to satisfy both sides of the debate, the northern areas of the former Louisiana were declared free, with the exception of the area known as Missouri, which was deemed a slave state. Missouri was admitted as a slave state while Maine was declared a free state. This was known as the "Missouri Compromise". In the year 1854, however, the decision was revoked by the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854. This act allowed individual areas of the region to decide whether their area would be free or not, depending on popular vote of the white male people inhabiting the area.